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Recovery Considerations   «Prev  Next»
Lesson 5 Technical considerations
ObjectiveExplore technical concerns related to the DBA role.

DBA Technical Considerations

Every DBA is faced with challenges that could be easily addressed, if only there were enough money. I have rarely heard a DBA complain that a system had too much horsepower or enough disk space. There are certain technical limitations that dictate the type of backup and recovery plan that you implement. For example, one site I worked at had triple the amount of disk space that the database required. That made it easy for us to automate physical image copies of the disks to alternate drives. We then backed up the copies to tape during the day and stored these tapes off site. Most sites don't have this luxury and have to bring their databases down to execute a backup.
DBAs have to take all the technical aspects of the operation of their company's business into consideration. Some of the questions a DBA might ask are ?
  1. How much disk and data do I have? When will I run out of space?
  2. When will I need to upgrade my hardware platform? ?
  3. Do I need a standby database? ?
  4. What are the likely failure points within my current environment? ?
  5. What is my transactional mix?

The image below illustrates what our project database environment will look like.
Project database environment
Project database environment

What are Technical Limitations that dictate the type of backup and recovery plan that you implement as an Oracle DBA

As an Oracle DBA, there are several technical limitations that dictate the type of backup and recovery plan that you can implement. Some of these limitations include:
  1. Data size: The amount of data that needs to be backed up and recovered can impact the type of backup and recovery plan that you implement. Large datasets may require different backup and recovery strategies than smaller datasets.
  2. Database complexity: The complexity of the database can impact the backup and recovery plan. For example, databases with multiple dependent objects, such as materialized views or partitions, may require a more complex backup and recovery strategy.
  3. Resource constraints: The available resources, such as disk space and network bandwidth, can impact the backup and recovery plan. If resources are limited, it may be necessary to implement a more efficient backup and recovery strategy.
  4. Recovery time objective (RTO): The required recovery time objective (RTO) can impact the backup and recovery plan. If a quick recovery is necessary, it may be necessary to implement a more robust backup and recovery strategy, such as real-time data replication.
  5. Recovery point objective (RPO): The required recovery point objective (RPO) can impact the backup and recovery plan. If a large amount of data loss is acceptable, a less frequent backup strategy may be sufficient. If a small amount of data loss is not acceptable, a more frequent backup strategy may be necessary.
  6. Hardware and software compatibility: The hardware and software configurations of the database infrastructure can impact the backup and recovery plan. It is important to ensure that the backup and recovery solution is compatible with the hardware and software configurations in use.
  7. Budget: The budget available for backup and recovery solutions can impact the type of backup and recovery plan that can be implemented. More expensive solutions may provide more features, but may not be feasible for smaller budgets.
The next lesson explores the components of an effective disaster recovery plan.

Technical Considerations - Exercise

Click the Exercise link below to test your knowledge of the operational and technical considerations of backup and recovery.
Technical Considerations - Exercise