Diagram Conventions   «Prev  Next»

Lesson 9

Entity-relationship diagrams Conclusion

In this module, you learned that there are several ER-diagram models, but they are all read in the same way. You also identified the various elements comprising the Crowsfoot model of an ER diagram. Best of all, you completed the project for this course, creating an ER diagram for Stories on CD, Inc.

Learning objectives

Having completed this module, you should be able to:
  1. Define the function of an entity-relationship (ER) diagram
  2. Describe the types of entity-relationship (ER) diagrams
  3. Identify conventions for diagramming entities and attributes
  4. Identify the constructs for diagramming types of relationships
  5. Identify the symbols for diagramming types of participation
  6. Revise an ER diagram based on a final review with users
  7. Describe how to verbalize an ER diagram

Glossary terms

This module introduced you to the following terms:
  1. Chen model: One of several types of entity-relationship ER diagrams. The Chen model is named after the inventor of ER diagramming.
  2. Crowsfoot model: One of several types of entity-relationship (ER) diagrams, the Crowsfoot model neatly packages entities with their attributes by placing them in boxes. Also referred to as the Information Engineering model.
  3. entity-relationship (ER) diagram','A diagram used during the design phase of database development to illustrate the organization of and relationships between data during database design.
  4. IDEF1X model: One of several types of entity-relationship (ER) diagrams. .Information Engineering (Crowsfoot) model - One of several types of entity-relationship (ER) diagrams; usually referred to as the "Crowsfoot" model..
  5. Crowsfoot model : One of several types of entity-relationship (ER) diagrams, the Crowsfoot model neatly packages entities with their attributes by placing them in boxes. Also referred to as the Information Engineering model.
  6. SQL: SQL is an acronym for Structured Query Language. It provides a set of commands that can be used to add data to a database, retrieve that data, and update it. SQL, often pronounced “sequel”, is universally supported by relational database vendors.
The next module concludes this course.